Ingrid Goes West (Spicer; 2017)

Social media is not exactly a new subject for Hollywood, but it also isn’t a subject that’s treated with insight often.  The Social Network is arguably the best work on the subject, but it’s more of a story of how a social media giant came to be than how social media affects our daily lives, while films like Catfish and Hard Candy focus more on very specific dangers inherent to social media.  Ingrid Goes West is the story of a woman who seeks meaningful human contact through Instagram, and it’s one of the first films that meaningfully shows us a mirror of just how pathetic our cultural quest for likes and tags has allowed us to become.

The cast and crew of Ingrid Goes West are not neophytes by a long shot, but neither are they big screen regulars.  Aubrey Plaza plays the titular Ingrid, and most of us know her for her television work than her work in film.  This the directorial debut of Matt Spicer who also wrote Ingrid Goes West, and he only has one other major motion picture credit to his name on the writing end of things.  The Director of Cinematography Bryce Fortner does have a long list of credits, but again these are mostly for shorts and television.  The only true big screen veteran in the cast is Elizabeth Olsen, who plays Taylor, the latest object Ingrid’s obsession, and even she has a relatively young career.  All this adds up to a film that has a very distinct style, even if that style isn’t terribly refined and often comes across as a really good episode of a television series.

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Ingrid Goes West opens with a quick montage showing Ingrid stalking a woman named Charlotte on Instagram on the day of Charlotte’s wedding.  We learn that Charlotte doesn’t even know Ingrid, that Ingrid has latched onto Charlotte since Charlotte once liked a comment from Ingrid on her Instagram page, and so when Ingrid marches into Charlotte’s wedding uninvited it’s a surprise.  When Ingrid sprays mace into Charlotte’s face as reprisal for not inviting her to the wedding, Ingrid lands in a mental institution.   Shortly after leaving the institution, Ingrid finds a new target to stalk – Taylor, an Instagram photographer and model of some notoriety, and when Ingrid’s mother dies leaving her a relatively large sum of money, Ingrid decides it’s time to go to Los Angeles and make Taylor her new best friend.

Ingrid Goes West is a difficult film to talk about in any real detail, as to do so may spoil elements of the film best left to the audience to discover, but I’ll take a small chance on a bit of a spoiler by letting you know that while the acting and visuals on display are well done (if, like I said earlier, a tad “television-y”) the reason to see Ingrid Goes West is it’s incredibly insightful look into just how much social media has infested every element of our culture and the impact it has had on our ability to treat others and even ourselves as real people rather than dispensers of instant gratification.  It’s easy to look at Ingrid in the film and write her off as pathetic and crazy, if also entertaining, but when we start to see that the characters we empathized with and saw ourselves in are just as fake and needy as Ingrid, just better at hiding it because they aren’t our point of view character, the movie starts getting real, for some it may be a bit too real.  The insight goes even deeper than this, and when the plot lines wrap up and our various characters are left to their fates at film’s end, you can see what a truly poignant and damning film Ingrid Goes West really is.

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Your enjoyment of Ingrid Goes West will depend not only on how open you are to the film’s themes, but also on how much you enjoy Aubrey Plaza’s style of comedy.  While Ingrid Goes West does have a strong cast of characters, Plaza’s Ingrid is the obvious ever present focus of the film, I don’t remember a single moment of film without her, and if you are not a fan of her deadpan, snarky, self deprecating while also disdainful delivery, then the other performers are probably not going to be enough to make up for the film taking on her demeanor as its own.  Elizabeth Olsen does give a great performance, as good as her showing in Wind River, O’Shea Jackson Jr. is charming as Dan, Ingrid’s long suffering landlord, and the remaining supporting cast are all darkly, quirkily humorous, but this movie is Plaza’s through and through.

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Final verdict:  Ingrid Goes West is a film that uses its razor sharp insight into our instant gratification social media society as both its main source of humor and commentary.  The humor is deadpan, often mean, and always smart, but it most certainly will not be everyone’s cup of tea.  Last week I praised Taylor Sheridan’s script as the best of the year so far.  Ingrid Goes West, while radically different in style and tone, matches, and possibly even surpasses Sheridan’s effort.  Ingrid Goes West, while entertaining, is never light entertainment, and often is downright nasty, but it’s nasty with a purpose.  Ingrid Goes West exposes truths about ourselves we don’t want to confront, but if it forces some of us to do so, we may find ourselves better off and happier for it in the long run.

 

 

Wind River (Sheridan; 2017)

The Western as a film genre pokes its head out every now and then every few years, but it’s been done as a regular Hollywood staple for roughly half a century.  For the past three years, however, Taylor Sheridan has been slyly bringing the genre back with a modern twist.  The Western takes on many forms, but it always takes place in the American West, of course, and it focuses on white men taming a frontier they are new to.  Once white civilization has taken over a territory, the film focusing on that place can no longer be called a Western.  Taylor Sheridan’s films all take place in rural Western communities, the twist being that these communities are in areas which have long since been tamed, but they are now largely overlooked.  In his film debut as a writer (Sheridan has been an actor for a long time) he gave us Sicario, the modern take on the Federales vs Banditos Western.  The next year he gave us Hell or High Water which is the modern retelling of the sheriff vs outlaws story.  Now, he writes and directs the classic cowboys and Indians Western, Wind River.

Wind River‘s central character is a Department of Fish, Game, and Wildlife agent named Cory Lambert played (Jeremy Renner).  He describes his job as hunting predators, and while doing his job hunting down a trio of mountain lions who killed one of his father-in-law’s cattle he comes across the body of a young girl from the nearby Wind River Reservation where his father-in-law lives.  After notifying the authorities, Cory finds himself working with the reservation’s Police Chief Ben (Graham Greene) and young FBI agent Jane Banner (Elizabeth Olsen, which means, yes, Hawkeye and Scarlet Witch are the two main characters in the film).  Jane is new enough to the FBI that she doesn’t really know how to handle the situation, but smart and self aware enough to realize this and convinces Cory to work the case with her by asking him to help her by doing his job and hunt down a predator.  It seems Cory has personal reasons to help, as well, and solving the murder mystery becomes the driving force of Wind River‘s plot, if not really the heart of its story.

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In Sicario Sheridan tells a story in which the law are just as corrupt as the criminals they are hunting, and the only difference between the two is who is pulling the organizational strings.  Hell or High Water shows us the banks being robbed are far more immoral and dangerous than the criminals doing the robbery, and even those on the side of the law are aware of this.  Wind River gives us a brutal metaphor which barely even counts as metaphor due to its lack of subtlety of how white civilization has treated the Native Americans since they were conquered and forced onto reservations.  He is intelligent enough to not make matters so black and white (no pun intended) than one side is completely sympathetic and the other completely despicable, but this modern cowboy and Indians story shows what affect 100 years plus of brutality and neglect by one group to another can have on the group on the receiving end of said neglect.

Sheridan’s script is up to his normal insanely high standards.  In addition to a plot which is gripping and meaningful he also serves up authentic but still engaging dialogue.  His metaphors will be a bit too much on the nose for some tastes, however, I don’t think the thematic elements of a story have to be subtle to be effective, and here Sheridan makes sure you can’t ignore his message.  The characters he creates are never stereotypes nor generalities, and that is still the case here as he gives us real three dimensional people with pasts which resonate strongly through their goals and actions, and he makes sure we understand why even the most despicable among them, and he gives us some of his most despicable characters to date in Wind River, act the way they do.

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The direction, however, is not up to the usual near perfection of a Taylor Sheridan film as Sheridan himself decided to direct this one and not hand off the reins to someone else, and while he is an excellent apparently natural talent, his lack of experience does show in a few areas.  The pacing is a bit off at times, showing that Sheridan most likely had a hard time editing himself, a very common mistake made by writer/directors.  The camera work, too, is on the basic side as conversations between people tend to devolve into scenes where the camera shoots whichever character is speaking at a mid-distance, then switches to the other person when they speak, and back and forth until the conversation ends.  Some of his shots of nature, however, can be quite spectacular, and the contrast between functional but dull and beautiful can actually add to the pacing problems felt from the not perfect editing.

The acting is also excellent for the most part, with most of the actors doing justice to the excellent script.  The minor roles, however, can be performed amateurishly breaking the story’s flow at times when a performance not quite up to the same snuff as the others stands out.  Still, if a character has a name, then the actor portraying that character is excellent, and this may in fact be the best performances of both Renner’s and Olsen’s careers.

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Final verdict:  Taylor Sheridan gave us one of the best films of 2015 and of 2016. and so far Wind River is absolutely one of the best films of 2017, though it is just a bit more flawed than his previous two efforts.  Sheridan has proven himself that he is one of the greatest working screen writers, and while it is only a matter of time before he wins an Oscar if he keeps going at this rate, this year will not be the one.  Wind River does not quite reach the must see status of Sicario and Hell or High Water, but it is still absolutely fantastic, and I will bump it up to must see status if you, like me, find great writing to be the best element of film making.  No matter your general tastes or inclinations, though, Wind River is an amazing film that should be seen, it just may be worth waiting until you can rent it to do so.